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from a hotel in san diego last week. police were on tactical alert for the grammy award. also the city putting out a $1 million reward for his arrest. the largest in the city's history. police are guarding 50 lapd families. >> it's my sincere desire to bring mr. dorneer to justice, to bring him to court, to capture him alive. that is absolutely what i want. and it would be my preference that if he's watching this, that he surrender so that we can end this nightmare. >> there is a task force of federal and local police to serve as a clearing house for those leads coming in. martha: where is the search focused now? i know they were in the bear mountain area last week. >> reporter: that's still going on. but this is a photo released by the riverside police of a victim. michael crane. former marine. two tours in the middle east. he leaves behind a wife and a son. police scaled back their search in the san bernardino mountains. they found two rifles and a handgunth his burngd out vehicle. the chief says they are going to reopen the hearing to assure the city that it was a fair hearing and n
and the first lady. hadiya pendleton was shot and killed while trying to escape gun fire in a chicago city park several blocks north of the obama family home in the win wood neighborhood. i will go to ted rowlands who is in chicago. i know there's going to be a press conference, you will have a number of officials on this. this is disturbing all around. it's not the first time. chicago has a terrible problem with violence, with gang violence. you have the first lady weighing in at the funeral on saturday. what are they going to do? >> reporter: well, that's a great question, suzanne. and there is in the wake of hadiya pendleton's death, there's a sense of urgency here. as you mentioned, this is not the first time a youngster has been killed in the cross fire with the gang violence on the streets of chicago. but this young woman has really struck a nerve. this was a young 15-year-old girl, who was doing all of the right things. she was a good student going to a great school here in chicago. her parents, great parents, who have encouraged her and her brother to do well in school. she was in the b
as for the city of new york, the state and the nation. i'm proud that we have been joined by several distinguished members of the congressional black caucus, which for more than four decades has been known as the conscience of the congress. and in that capacity, the congressional black caucus has year after year spent time trying to perfect our democracy and create a more perfect union. we confront that moment right now here in this great country of ours as we try and figure out how we deal with creating a pathway towards citizenship for the more than 11 million undocumented immigrants who are forced to toil in the shadow. we have been joined today as co-anchor for this next hour, distinguished classmate of mine from the great state of nevada, mr. horsford, who had the opportunity to be present while president obama delivered his remarks as it relates to immigration reform. and so i would like to ask mr. horsford if he might comment on the president's remarks and weigh in on the immigration debate from his perspective as a representative from an important state in nevada. mr. horsford: thank you,
diagonalling them. we had a prayer vigil at city hall in public. there was no incidents, there was a great turnout. people showed that, coming down and you know, voting with their feet, so to speak and letting us know that they feel safe and they wanted to show support for the officers that have been involved in this and their families and to lift up prayers on their behalf. >> chief, i just heard the mayor say that riverside is safe and secure. i am sure that -- i hope the people feel that way and indeed, i hope they are. but you had two armed police officers on a routine duty who are not safe and secure. and they are armed. so this is a very dangerous situation. we have a rogue cop threatening to kill more fri. riverside, this was a random act of violence that came into our city. and so we responded appropriately and the police chief has led by example and is taking care of has troops, as well as our city. >> well, i wish all of you -- >> greta -- >> go ahead, chief. >> i wanted to add that we do believe that there was no specific target in riverside. i believe that these two officers un
protecting cops. this man is a threat to every person in los angeles. >> reporter: a city in fear is fighting back, offering a $1 million reward for dorner's capture and conviction. police have received more than 700 tips, including one that led them to this lowe's sunday night. the shooting spree began about a week ago when monica kwan and her fiance were shot to death in a parking lot. an alleged execution by dorner, who was angry at her father. a former los angeles police captain. >> to have your family targeted because they're related to you? that is absolutely terrifying. >> reporter: abc news learned that a man claiming to be dorner has called kwan's father to taunt him, telling the grieving dad he should have done a better job protecting his daughter. police have vowed to catch dorner, but for now the city can only hope the shooting doesn't start again. pierre thomas, abc news, los angeles. >> here's the scary part of this story. there are still 50 police officers whose families are being guarded. their family as are being guarded. we are talking about a force, how big and the police o
they're scratching their heads the first month because there's only - well no big city book editor did it so to be a best seller you need new york times or the chronicle or boston globes to give you good book reviews. no national t.v. or, m pr so paul said what's going on out there. i said, you know this is what i think it's about book clubs and women's groups, synagogues, mosques and churches and an incredible amount of book clubs here in the bay view area and about people yearning for piece and looking for the answers of peace. any ways it's been really incredible and aspire together see people from all walks of life i really think can re late to promoting peace one child at a time. we got some news last month that the pentagon purchased 5,000 copies. let me finish it. and it's for counter intelligence training, 101 and mandatory reading for they're course encounter intelligence. this is in tan sa any a. i went there when i was three years old and my father founded a medical center and my mother started a school. it was a wonderful childhood. i went to school with children from two d
of privacy he will have now. want to go live to vatican city inside of rome, italy, where father jonathan morris, fox news religion contributor. he is live in the vatican. that is place where he spent many years working. father, hello to you. explain the message from the pontiff today. >> sure, bill. the whole issue of his privacy that he brought up is very interesting pause it is true that he was saying, after i retire, right, coming up tomorrow as you said at 8:00 p.m. rome time, i'm not just going to be a private citizen of the world anymore where i can go as he said and give conferences or talks. he said, no, i will always be the one who was pope. it is now pope emeritus. he said the way he will be a pope emeritus by being in a monastery and convent, making reference to st. benedict, who was a monk. he said that is the type of life i will lead. quiet in prayer, doing service to the church, instead of going back to be what he was before he became pope. very interesting. there will not be a pope making commentary on the new pope, words and actions. bill: i think when we think about his
. this city has seen more than 260 pontiffs, only two popes passed in the last thousand years have left like this. the cardinals, princes of the church, gathered this morning for a warm farewell to pope benedict. some cardinals wants to speak to him for as long as possible. pope benedict will resign just after sunset. this home, this beautiful summer palace, quiet after a frantzic few weeks. >> at 8:00 exactly, he will stop being pope, the swiss guards who stand guard outside the palace and he'll go. >> reporter: rough seas he admitted yesterday and now the task begins of choosing his successor. >> i think there's a yearning out there for something different. somebody new somebody fresh. perhaps it younger. the conclave with 200 years of experience, secret ballots cast in the existing chapel. in many ways this will be different, this time a retired pope will be watching from the sidelines. >> we have to watch to see how it plays out. it's completely uncharted waters. >> reporter: the cardinals must choose a man to lead the difficult time for the church. they have yet to set a date but the ne
, etc. if every city and mitropoulos got hit hard on home building and retail and began to look up there traded sectors and began to look at the advance manufacturing sectors and basically would say, what do they need to survive and prosper? and do we have a skills problem? do we have an infrastructure problem? do we have an innovation break down, essentially between research and development, a prototype, development? this will basically follow the health of the cluster and particularly with small and medium-sized firms, what are they doing to essentially help lee is relatively small firms? -- help these small firms.?? >> john, said a funny thing. you said no matter how much the government screws up, caltech will still be caltech and m.i.t. will still be m.i.t. outside the beltway, it is a different reality and you talked about public and private partnerships at the local level. can you talk about why they are so important and maybe share your story about how you see the power partnerships? >> i did not mind it versus the real world. i spend most of my time with the company's seen
in the cities like kabul and other main cities we have. like kabul from nowadays we're having social media like facebook and twitter that people are receiving the news. but more than 73% of the population of afghanistan is receiving their information through radio. host: what about the literacy rates? in afghanistan, according to the cia fact book, literacy rate overall is 28%. given those numbers, how difficult is it your job of getting information to afghanis? guest: when you see almost 28% of the country is literate, meaning more than 72% mark is illiterate, that means we are faced with people they are not easy to receive things or digest things, so it is very hard in a country like afghanistan with the fact that more than 70% are illiterate, on the other hand, in afghanistan security, reaching for the people because of bad [indiscernible] because of the geographic afghanistan, it is hard work, but it does not mean it will stop us. host: our guest abdul mujeeb khalvatgar is director of nai media institute. we're talking about journalism in afghanistan, how afghanis get their news and the fre
story, as i've been saying. tell me about the mood out there in the city. your readership, and why this has been such a grabber, even as it developed in the beginning with this fellow with a grievance against the lapd. he claimed it was a racist situation. that hasn't been backed up by anyone that involved him going on this murder rampage of killing four people now allegedly. and perhaps going to kill more. tell me about the readership you've got whom. you talking to out there? people seem to be rapt in their attention. >> very much so. the lapd holds a pretty -- people are fascinated with the lapd to begin with. there is a sort of base level of interest that runs in the city for the lapd. it is a storied institution. it has a very infamous and famous past. so you start out from that, and you add on to a story like you outlined that really hollywood couldn't make up if they tried. it has all the elements of a movie that we probably will see some day in the theaters when screenwriters get ahold of it. but it has been a story that the city has gripped on to. our readership quite lite
-tech in brooklyn, a collaboration between new york public schools, the city university of new york, and ibm, students will graduate with a high school diploma and an associate degree in computers or engineering. we need to give every american student opportunities like this. four years ago, we started race to the top -- a competition that convinced almost every state to develop smarter curricula and higher standards, for about 1 percent of what we spend on education each year. tonight, i'm announcing a new challenge to redesign america's high schools so they better equip graduates for the demands of a high-tech economy. we'll reward schools that develop new partnerships with colleges and employers, and create classes that focus on science, technology, engineering, and math -- the skills today's employers are looking for to fill jobs right now and in the future. now, even with better high schools, most young people will need some higher education. it's a simple fact -- the more education you have, the more likely you are to have a job and work your way into the middle class. but today, skyro
. >>> as an unmarried small business owner in new york city who does not own a home, i'm taxed at one of the highest rates in the country. forfeiting upwards of 50% of my income to local, state, and federal government every year. i'm sure this e lice sits few tears of sympathy, that's okay, but for many young millennials who have dreams of moving to the big city, starting their own business and one day owning their own home, this should be something of a wake-up call. david burstein's new book is a must read for anyone between the ages of 18 and 30 looking to survive in an economy that is in many ways unable to keep up with you and for anyone interested in shaping policy with 80 million people in mind. millennials are the largest generation in the united states history and by 2020 they will account for 1 out of every 3 adults. we interviewedb burstein last week. what he said about millennials was fascinating. this is a generation that came of age in the midst of permanent war, a housing boom and bust, a recession and staggering unemployment, skyrocketing costs of education and most recently a govern
public schools and city university of north carolina and ibm, students will graduate with a high school diploma and an associates degree in computers or engineering. we need to give every american student opportunities like this, and four years ago, we started race to the top. the competition that convinced almost every state to develop smarter curricula and higher standards. all for about 1% of what we spent on education each year. tonight i'm announcing a new challenge, to redesign america's high schools so they better equip graduates for the demands of a high-tech economy, and we'll reward schools that delve now partnerships with colleges and employers and create classeses in science, technology, engineering and math. the skills today's employers are looking for to fill the jobs that are there right now, and will be there in the future. now, even with better high schools, most young people will need some higher education. it's a simple fact. the more education you've got, the more likely you are to have a good job and work your way into the middle class. but today's skyrocketing cost
of the very practices under shaken by the city units that you once operated. for example, as treasury secretary he would be responsible for coordinating implementation of the so-called looker rules, which is intended to separate proprietary trading from the federally insured financial activities. you stated that you support the rule, and yet you were the chief operating officer for the units engaged in the sort of the activities the rule was meant to prevent. therefore if you were to be confirmed it could lead to an awkward situation in which your role as the chair of the fsoc from tester of the fsoc coming to effectively saying to the financial firms do as i say, not as i did. now these are not trivial matters. indeed, they bear directly on your qualifications to serve as the next treasury secretary. if the committee was given time to examine the record more thoroughly before today's hearing, i'm sure many of the questions that have already been answered. we have to explore some of these matters here today. finally, i just want to mention that when we met the nomination i told you th
these job creating projects in your city. i've seen all those ribbon cuttings. so tonight, i propose a fix it first program to put people to work as soon as possible on aur most urgent repairs like the nearly 70,000 structurally deficient bridges across the country. and to make sure taxpayers don't shoulder the whole burden, i'm also proposing a partnership to rebuild america that attracts private capital to upgrade what our businesses need most, modern ports to move our goods, modern pipelines to withstand a form, modern schools worthy of our children. let's prove there's no better place to do business than here in the united states of america and let's start right away. we can get this done. part of our rebuilding effort must also involve our housing sector. the good news is our housing market is finally healing from the collapse of 2007. home prices are rising at the fastest pace in six years. home purchases are up nearly 50%. and construction is expanding again, but even with mortgage rates near a 50-year low, too many families with solid credit who want to buy a home are being rejecte
and was a victim of random violence in that city. the first lady inviting her to be here tonight to hear the president's remarks on gun safety and gun violence. >> schieffer: there's lindsey graham, scott, one of the president's toughest critics of late over the benghazi incident. but senator graham managed to get up there and shake hands with the president as he comes down the aisle. >> pelley: and there's the president with the chief justice of the united states john roberts jr. john roberts jr. who cast the vote that saved the president's signature achievement of his first term the health care legislation. president greeting sonia sotomayor, one of the newest members of the supreme court. and elena kagan, the newest member. general martin dempsey, chairman of the joint chiefs of staff. making his way to the podium now. and here's the president of the united states for his fifth state of the union address. (cheers and applause) thank you! (cheers and applause) thank you. (applause) thank you. thank you. >> members of congress, i have the high privilege and distinct honor of presenting
the country on daily basis are equally tragic. last month, 40 people in chicago 500 killed in that city last year. >> chris: that's right. and one of the teachers from sandy hook elementary is first grade teacher who sheltered her children and was able to save to them from adam lanza, he is in the box, as well. we are running seven minutes behind schedule. chief washington correspondent, james rosen. you know this was supposed to be timed 90 seconds. president is not here yet. >> these are staged events and sometimes things happen and they don't run on time. probably the president preparing for his remarks. this is fascinating event on capitol hill. it dates back to 1790 and it is in the constitution. >> chris: we're about to get the call with a big announcement. mr. speaker, the president of the united states! [ applause ] >> this state of the union is going literally members of the house and senate to the house chamber and will sit there for five, six hours so they can be right on the aisle and have this moment to shake hands with the president and say hello. sometimes if there is a proble
, cities, to last. siemens. answers. >>> issue one. drone on. >> drones are uavs. unmanned aerial vehicles. aircraft that are operated remotely from nearby or from thousands of miles away, like the distance between the nation of afghanistan and the air force base in the u.s. state of nevada. drones come in various shapes, sizes and weights. they are used for surveillance, disablement, and killing. and drones are increasingly ubiquitous. there are 64 drone bases spread across the united states alone, and the u.s. has other drone installations across the planet. africa is increasingly a drone base environment. a newly authorized site in the nation of niger will become the sixth u.s. drone base in africa, joining one in morocco, senegal, uganda, and a permanent one in djibouti. u.s. drone attacks ordered by obama have spiked particularly in yemen, somalia, afghanistan, and notably pakistan where over 360 drone strikes over the nine years, 2004 to 2013, have killed over 3,000 people. this data is not classified. and not even secret. but it is troubling. so troubling that the u.n. has just deci
state law allow cities and counties to ban cannabis dispensaries? even though voters approve the use of medical marijuana? >> the legislature knows how to say, thou shalt not ban dispensaries. they didn't say that. >> that's the question before california's highest court this week. the ruling could have a huge impact on the state's massive medical marijuana industry. >>> job growth in silicon valley is outpacing the rest of the nation. but a new report says the income gap between rich and poor is widening. leaving some minorities behind. >>> with the number of people riding bicycles rising fast, san francisco planners roll out a multimillion dollar strategy to add bike lanes, parking stations and other improvements. we'll talk with the head of the san francisco bicycle coalition. >>> plus, california takes the first step to grant special protection to the ocean's top predator. coming up next.
that are there. now at schools like p-tech in brooklyn, a collaboration between new york public schools and city university of new york and i.b.m., students will graduate with a high school diploma and an associate's degree in computers or engineering. we need to give every american student opportunities like this. and four years ago... ( applause ) four years ago we started race to the top, the competition that convinced almost every state to develop smarter curricula and higher standards. all for about 1% of what we ve spent on education each year. tonight i'm announcing a new challenge: to redesign america's high schools so they better equip graduates for the demands of a high-tech economy. and we'll reward schools that develop new partnerships with colleges and employers and create classes that focus on science, technology, engineering, and math. the skills today's employers are looking for to fill the jobs that are there right now and will be there in the future. now even with better high schools, most young people will need some higr education. the simple fact that the more education you'v
of this country right now. the deficit is hurting our counties, cities, and our villages. for the first time, maybe not in this country but in his presidency, we have big cities that are going bankrupt. so what i heard about the president's speech tonight was a lot of spending. spending, spending, spending and not enough to help people. i think medicare and social security is not the fault of the poverty people of this country. i think it is the fault of society as a whole. by the way, government is for the people and by the people and this is not barack obama's government. it is the american people's government. thank you. >> let's take a look at the president's comments on gun violence from the state of the union earlier tonight. >> it has been two months since newtown. i know this is not the first time that this country has debated on how to reduce gun violence. but this time it is different. overwhelming majority of americans, american who is believe in the second amendment, have come together around common sense reform. like background checks that will make it harder for criminals to ge
. peter's square in vatican city, where you used to work for a number of years. i know he's still the pope until the end of the month. they would like a new pope by easter, which is 46 days from right now. we've got a list of some of the top contenders. i don't want you to analyze all of them but tell us generally. a lot of americans go why can't we have an american pope. why can't we have an american pope? >> we can. we don't know if we will. we can. there are 117 cardinals that will be voting in this conclave. 117, all cardinals who are under the age of 80. it could be any one of them. very few people guessed cardinal rapsinger at the time. >>steve: because today is ash wednesday, many people may be unfamiliar is lent. what is lent? >> preparation of a time for easter. we think of how much goes into preparation for the super bowl. we had for days people getting ready talking about the best food and all the rest. how about getting ready for a wedding? how much does a bride or groom put into getting ready for a wedding? these are 46 days in preparation for easter, getting our mind, body an
it is appropriate and fitting your best city made by side as it happens have certain effects in your permit in certain effects throughout general austin's command. can you give us your sense now, you have a day-to-day basis when engaged in deliberate planning -- can you give us your sense of what the threat daughter and africom and how well-positioned africom is. >> the press and africom reliever bob rudd three major areas, one being al qaeda and the islamic mockery of, which is where the french operations and the united states is ongoing. also al-shabaab in somalia a book for her rom and also the ally ray has discussed earlier here. visit the major threats to stability militarily, but of course they have significant other wants and government as well as health issues. >> i think you've touched on something that again is a critical issue that cuts across government capacity to provide basic service, the ability of governments to function is not as, at least to respond to the true nature of the people. one of the issues we talked about is that we have had military training operations that ha
there are new reports about the pope's health. a allen pizzey is in vatican city. >> reporter: pope benedict has been wearing a pacemaker for some time and had an operation eplace to replace the battery three months ago. how much his declining health and the strain of dealing with scand the vatican leaks and sex abuse scandals is only speculation. only a few of his closest aides new in advance. with his brief announcement in latin, benedict set a modern precedent that ensures his t that successors can take the same path, as one cardinal put it he broke a taboo. catholics around the world reacted with surprise some sadness, but overall there was a sense that benedict had done the right thing, for himself and the church. >> it is quite an act of ch. humility for the pope to realize that he can no longer physically and mentally discharge the duties of his office. ♪>> reporte >> reporter: even as benedict's ated t legacy is being debated the struggle for succession has begun behind the scenes. latin americans feel their time come has come and there are several strong candidate
. our next caller from jersey city, new jersey. caller: good evening. i just wanted to make a comment. i do think that this whole issue is very much an interesting issue. i do think it is a bit exaggerated. the thing is, things do happen. the whole talk about america's life expectancy may be lower than the other developed countries -- but i think unless we come up with innovative ways to bring it better met, alleviation for the health crisis, only thereafter we can really think about all of the solutions. i guess we are just beating around the bush, as they say. host: avoiding what, exactly? caller: talking about the -- not really the solutions. what to do exactly. host: you would like to hear more recommendations? caller: absolutely. guest: the caller makes a good point. the third part of our report is all about recommendations. we feel that because of the gravity of our findings, our society, our country, our state and local communities really need to do something about this. we get into some detail about what we need to do. it is a call for action. host: tell us about the amount of mo
, a collaboration of public schools and the city of new york and. >> joy: bm, students will graduate with a high school diploma and an associates degree in commuters or engineer engine--computerrers and engineering. we need to give every student opportunities like this. four years ago we started race to the top. the competition that convinced almost every state to develop smarter curricula and higher standards, all on one-third of what we spend on education each year. tonight i'm announcing a new challenge, redesign america's high school to better equip graduates for the high tech economy. we've create classes that focus on science technology, engineering and math. the skills employers are looking for to fill jobs that are there right now and will be there in the future. now even with better high schools most young people will need some higher education. it's a simple fact. the more education you've got, the more likely you are to have a good job and work your way in the middle class. but today's skyrocketing cost price too many young people out of a higher education or saddle them with unsustai
interests in the city. i'd like to have you go ahead and put that chart up. and leave it up during the course of this hearing because each member up here has a copy of this. there are certain things that happened we all know. we know on may 22 the red cross was hit with an r.p.g. they left town. we know on june 11, the british ambassador's motorcade was attacked by an r.p.g. they left town. we know on april 10 the united states convoy was hit by an i.e.d. and on june 6, the u.s. consulate was attacked with a bomb and many, many other things. but we stayed. we didn't leave. while i understand the state department has primary responsibility for the protection of american diplomats around the world, i also understand that the defense department plays an important role -- supporting role to this effect. i expect our witnesses to explain today why, given the clear indication -- indicators tanned warnings, threats to the united states interests in benghazi and throughout the north africa were growing was the -- was the defense department not placed on a heightened alert status or adequat
grounded for venturing without permission to the other side of the city. [laughter] second, i started to pay special attention to the plaques on the buildings that recommend -- that recognize the united states of america for lending a hand in rebuilding. i was proud. the marshall plan, imf, and other organizations led by the united states are evidence of our ability to make the right decisions at the right time, taking risks today in the interest of tomorrow. we now face a similar crossroads. we can be complacent or competitive as markets bloom in every corner of the world. with or without us. we could be there to help plant the seeds or we can see the power to others. given the chance to lead a second great american century, we must not just look to the american landscape today. look at the days to come. we must marshal the courage that define the the marshall plan so that we might secure in the future freedom. let's remember the principles of jefferson's time. looking to independence echoing in our time. america's national interest is in leading strongly and it still in doers in thi
and producing in ge-sun city work -- ge- sensitive markets. we will look at monitoring, maintaining the. t of publicly held germ classes, because there is concern about that. -- the purity of publicly-held germ classes, because there is concern about that. as will mitigate the risk associated when folks want to do things a little bit differently, in the same general space. it is part of managing risk. the long-term risk we will face, with a changing climate -- i will conclude with this. there is no question that the climate is changing. we recently furnished to assessments from usda on the impact of changing climates on agriculture and forestry. the conclusions were pretty obvious. higher temperatures lead to more intense weather patterns. more intense weather patterns lead to greater stress for crops and livestock. and increase tree mortality. we at usda have a responsibility to figure out ways in which we can mitigate the risks of something we really cannot control. when it happens, we cannot control when a drought occurs. we cannot control when a horrible tornado hits, or when flooding
towards a freer environment of the city and move from the south to the north and that is what most people did. in the process of doing that, some of it became politicized. >> host: because they expected things to be markedly different in the north. they didn't think racism was in the north. >> guest: in the north they are not going to be murdered for taking a stand. and so in the relatively freer environment they are able to really create the conditions for the modern movement. >> host: talk about some of the people of the movement. those in sncc and those nclc and others. who were the people who'd -- was a king, was that nocco max? was that the death of medgar evers? >> guest: all of the above. all of them had different roles. one of the ways in which i try to explain this is rosa parks made martin luther king possible. martin luther king didn't make rosa parks possible. if she hadn't done what she did by refusing to give a per seat on the montgomery bus martin luther king would have simply been an articulate, well meaning baptist minister. it's because of rosa parks that we are talking
living and working here are undocumented. jose zacarias, the only hispanic city council member believes a path to citizenship will empower more hispanics to help run the town in which they are the majority. >> maybe a generation more will be integrated, established in this community. >> reporter: two communities in one trying to grow together in a changing world. mark potter, nbc news, west liberty, iowa. >> meanwhile, in washington, we are six days away from budget cuts known as the sequester going into effect and with congress having taken the last week off it doesn't seem we're any closer to a deal being reached than we were at this time last week. just how are both sides playing their sequester strategies? joining me to discuss that in the war room is admiral joe sestak, former navy officer and pennsylvania congressman and republican strategist and former aide to george h.w. bush. thank you for being with me, gentlemen. >> good to be with you, mara. >> let's start with the president's strategy. this week he did a bunch of local interviews and the white house issued a bunch of press
hour by announcing this prophetic pic of a lightning strike in vatican city yesterday. this news was really like a lightning strike to everyone around the globe. has the vatican talked more about any decisions behind the scenes? we do know that the pope has a pacemaker. they've put that out there. he's had it for years, but have they decided or released what were the real factors behind the scenes? because this is uncharted territory. >> it is, absolutely, uncharted. and they're still in a state of shock here, i have to tell you. but from a lot of people that i've been talking to since i got on the ground here, and also speaking the to the vatican spokesman, there doesn't seem to be more to it than the fact that the pope is 85 years old, he's gotten increasingly frail in recent months. and frankly, this is somebody who has to run what is a global enterprise, 1.1 billion catholics around the world. and i think he just realized that there was so much on his plate, that with modern medicine and our ability to keep people alive longer, but perhaps not with the energy and vitality tha
to september 11th there were no fewer than four significant attacks against the western interests in the city. i'd like to have you put the chart up there, and leave it up during the course of this hearing, because each member of here has a copy of this, and there's certain things that happened we all know. we know that on may 22nd the red cross was hit with an rpg. they left town. we know that on june 11th, the british ambassador's motorcade was attacked by an rpg. they left town. we know on april 10th, the united nations convoy was hit by an ied, and on june 6th the u.s. consulate was attacked with a bomb. and many, many other things and we didn't leave. while i understand the state department has primary responsibility for the protection of american diplomats rolled the world, also understand that the defense department plays an important supporting role to this effect. i suspect or witnesses to explain today why, given the clear indicators and warnings, thats to the united states interests in ben georgia si, and throughout the north africa, were growing, was the defense department not pla
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